Chicago Cthulhu

Game 2: The Haunted House in Corbis Wood (continued)

Corbis Wood, Massachusetts

They all began discussing the previous night’s events, expressing concerns over whether Marta had been possessed. Paul suggested that there may be three ghosts haunting the house. He needed to regain his spiritual energy to conduct additional seances, and enlisted the group’s aid in discovering more spirits that are haunting the place. They decided to explore the remainder of the house, then head to the village.

They searched the Master Bedroom, and found Katherine Tannerhill’s bible, which had a list of dates in it.

  • June 1680 – Katherine and Quentin Tannerhill’s marriage (Handwriting Style A)
  • February 1687 – Adoption of Luther Tannerhill nee Lee (Handwriting Style A)
  • November 1692 – Begun the Purification (Handwriting Style A)
  • March 1699 – Destruction of the Devil’s Spawn (Handwriting Style A)
  • January 1700 – Beloved Katherine Tannerhill, died of the cold (Handwriting Style B)
  • January 1893 – The Devil’s Spawn has risen again (Handwriting Style A)
  • January 1895 – The Devil’s Spawn died in blood and shame…My God what have I done? (Handwriting Style A…transitions to C)

Some handwriting analysis by Mr. Berkeley resulted in the realization the later handwriting of the last two dates were in Katherine’s handwriting despite being two hundred years later, and that the handwriting on the last date at the end changes to be more similar to another example of Agnes Carrington’s handwriting.

Later they went down to the church to look through the files, which Reverend Lewis gave permission to do. They made note of a few facts they learned there:

  • Corbis Wood had a relatively uneventful history, save for the trial of Marion Lee, a spinster and seamstress, tried and hanged for witchcraft in 1687.
  • Marion Lee gave birth to a baby boy just a couple of months prior to her trial.
  • Quentin Tannerhill and Katherine Tannerhill adopted the boy, Luther Lee, in February 1687 after Marion’s execution.
  • Jenny Carrington died in 1895 from blood loss after cutting her own wrist. As it was a suicide, she was buried in an unconsecrated part of the graveyard at the Corbis Wood Congregationalist Church.

They returned to the house, and prepared for another seance. Armed with new information and some competing theories, they embarked on a course to dissipate the energy of the ghosts. They summoned Katherine, and Paul attempted to dissipate her energy, but someone broke the circle and Katherine took over Marta and began to attack them with the hatchet. They managed to subdue her with a chair by vigorously punching her and then tying her up. They eventually summoned Luther and dissipated his energy (Paul knows now only to dissipate when the code word “banana hammock” is used). Finally they end up interrogating Katherine and dissipating her energy.

They checked the bloody nail and it had stopped dripping. They checked the next morning and Jenny’s spirit was no longer there, and Paul certified that all spirits have been dissipated from the home.

Having been through so much with them, Paul decided to tell them the true story of how he acquired his abilities. In his words:

“Earlier, I told you that my abilities manifested as a child when I started to see dead people. This isn’t the truth, but a story that Herb has made me tell people. He thought it would be a good idea and make for a good story, but I don’t feel comfortable being deceptive with you all any more. The real tale is much stranger, if you can believe it.”

“When I was 17, I suffered a series of nightmares that left me hospitalized with partial amnesia. After I was discharged, I disappeared from the hospital for eight years, to return eight years later to that hospital and be admitted on account of amnesia. When I was finally discharged, I begin to manifest certain psychic abilities. I can commune with the spirits of the deceased, and sometimes I have prophetic dreams of little of great importance.”

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